Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Planning (PLAN)

PLAN-600  Fundamentals: Seminar & Studio Of Planning  - (5 Credits)  

Presents the basic principles and practices of planning as they relate to the political planning process. Topics include the ethical and legislative basis for planning, approval processes, components of a master plan, components of subdivision/site plan regulations, zoning ordinances, special legislative powers, environmental reviews, capital budget processes, public participation and the role of key government agencies.

PLAN-601A  Skills I: Introduction to GIS Planning and Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

This course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems software as used in city planning practice. Students become familiar with and gain experience analyzing data and producing professional maps. The course will be conducted in coordination with the mini-studio project in PLAN 656: Fundamentals of Planning.

PLAN-601B  Skills I: Writing for Planners Planning and Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

This course introduces students to professional writing as used in city planning practices. Students become familiar with and gain experience producing professional written forms, such as the planning report, the opinion piece or letter to the editor and public testimony. They also become familiar with synthesizing data and writing about graphics. The course will be conducted in coordination with the mini-studio project in PLAN 600: Fundamentals: Seminar & Studio.

PLAN-601C  Skills I: Manual Graphics Planning and Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

This mini course is designed for graduate planning students with little or no design experience as an introduction to hand-drawn graphics for planning and design. It strives to combines both a critical understanding of the theories and practice of graphical representation with hands-on skill development.

PLAN-601D  Skills I: Computer Graphics Planning and Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

The course will consist of lectures, readings, in-class demonstrations, and discussion based assignments reviews. Students will be introduced to basic graphic concepts, raster/vector graphics, mapping, screen vs. print composition, graphic voice, weight and emphasis, photo manipulation, storyboarding and presentation technique. Students may use course assignments to fulfill requirements for the corresponding mini-studio.

PLAN-601E  Skills 1: Infographics  - (1 Credit)  

This course introduces students to methods and tools for visual communication using information graphics. The five-week course will review information graphic types, principles of visual reasoning, graphic design, and methods for story-boarding. In-class exercises will demonstrate methods for creating information graphics using Illustrator, Photoshop, and Indesign and emphasize the integration of these three applications as well as Excel for effective presentation-making. A four-part assignment of documentation and interpretation of urban phenomena will focus on the synthesis of various information graphics in order to generate visual contexts for planning and design actions.

PLAN-602  History & Theory of City Planning  - (3 Credits)  

Theories of planning focus on the normative issues that arise in considering why and what we plan. Under this heading are questions of ideology, values, purposes, and principles, including gender, race and class. Theories of planning also involve questions of governmental intervention and public legitimization. Since the process of planning is affected by changes in social, economic, and political contexts, this course examines and evaluates the theory of planning practice in various historical periods.

PLAN-603  Urban Economics  - (3 Credits)  

Presents economic theory and method through the study of selected urban issues, including user charges, externalities and property rights, subsidies and vouchers, public services and efficiency, and the public economy of metropolitan areas. Readings are chosen to introduce economic issues from distinct philosophical perspectives.

PLAN-604  Planning Law  - (3 Credits)  

Planners must have an understanding of how the legal system shapes the analysis, organization, and articulation of public goals and interests. This course covers the following subjects as they relate to the definition and achievement of concerted social action: the structure of government; the scope of authority of agencies and the substantive and procedural limits on various kinds of private and public actions; the major concepts of the law in which planning programs may be structured and planning disputes resolved; the vocabulary and procedural framework of legal dispute resolution; the ability to read statutes and regulations, find case law, and comprehend judicial opinions; the concepts of constitutional law, common law, case precedents and judicial review; and advocacy and the adversarial process as the basic method of dispute resolution.

PLAN-605  Planning Methods I  - (3 Credits)  

by planners in their professional activities. It includes a discussion of various uses and types of data, compilation and reliability of data, population and housing characteristics, population dynamics, methods for estimating population and models for forecasting population.

PLAN-606B  Statistics: Fundamentals  - (2 Credits)  

Covers fundamental concepts and methods in inferential statistics and basic economics most widely used by urban planning professionals. In the first half of the semester, students cover such statistical techniques as elementary probability theory, decision-tree analysis, measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing and various correlation techniques. Topics covered in economics include concepts of supply and demand, microeconomics and discounting costs and benefits over time. The course provides necessary preparation for later courses in demographics and public finance.

PLAN-701  Planning Methods II  - (3 Credits)  

Provides students with knowledge of a range of advanced quantitative and qualitative analytical methods used in urban planning. This course covers basic survey methodology, advanced land use analysis, transportation planning methods, global and local economic trend analysis, methods in environmental and regional planning, advanced demography, program evaluation, policy analysis and policy evaluation. Readings include planning texts and case studies.

PLAN-702A  GIS I: Fundamentals  - (3 Credits)  

Introduces students to basic concepts in data management, spreadsheet analysis, digital mapping and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) within the context of planning projects. The uses of selected spreadsheet and GIS packages in various areas of planning, such as land use, real estate, environmental management, transportation and infrastructure planning are investigated. Students get hands-on experience with Excel, MAP INFO, and dBase packages.

PLAN-702B  Advanced GIS  - (3 Credits)  

The course provides advanced instruction in geographic information systems (GIS) for urban planning applications. Skills covered include database management for GIS, interactive mapping technologies, use of maps to track social and environmental data over space and time, geocoding, advanced cartography, open source computer mapping developments, and 3D applications of GIS. Students develop the ability to analyze data spatially and use maps to represent complex social, geological and environmental phenomena.

PLAN-702C  Continuing Gis  - (1 Credit)  

The purpose of this course is to introduce students with some familiarity in the use of mapping techniques and data analysis to the most common processes used by professional planners who employ Geographic Information Systems (GIS) --a computer-based technology to aid in the collection, analysis, output and communication of spatial information for display in multi-layered maps. In addition to exploring the dynamics of the processes above, the course will focus its assignments on the development of a mapping project studying the land use, demographic, and/or socio economic trends of giving community in New York City.

PLAN-711  Advocacy Planning & Action  - (3 Credits)  

Advocacy planning is a major force in community, city, and regional decision-making processes. The evolution, current status and projected role of advocacy in the planning and design domains are considered. Topics include citizen participation in political and developmental activities; changing governmental policies affecting neighborhood housing and commercial programs; work with established and underrepresented community groups; the ideological premises of advocacy and social action; and the relationship of the planner to society and societal concerns. The course incorporates lectures, seminar discussions, guest presentations and student field-related projects. It is a prerequisite for further independent study in the advocacy field.

PLAN-712A  Housing & Community Renewal  - (1 Credit)  

Housing development, particularly affordable housing, is a key component of planning for sustainable cities. This course will examine the dynamic relationships among social needs, planning & design, financial considerations, infrastructure and environmental issues, and political and social factors. Students will expand their proficiency in professional skills used in housing development, focused on residential real estate development, financing, and financial analysis.

PLAN-712B  Affordable Housing Methods  - (1 Credit)  

Housing is a universal social necessity that at once plays a critical role in our built environment and acts as a major force in our economy. This mini course is designed to provide a basic introduction to residential real estate development, financing and financial analysis for affordable housing development. It focuses on developing critical analysis of the various constraints which shape housing development projects: economic, physical, legal, tax and market concerns.

PLAN-712C  Special Needs Housing  - (1 Credit)  

This 5-week course will expand students understanding of affordable housing development by focusing on housing for people with special needs and the supportive housing model. It will discuss the evolution and history, current policy implications, and the design and financing of supportive housing. Additionally, it will focus on how we adequately and equitably plan for supportive housing in cities and communities. Students should have a basic knowledge of affordable housing development and finance.

PLAN-713A  Community Economic Development Perspective  - (2 Credits)  

Downtowns are essential for a community's economic and civic health. This course explores multi-disciplinary strategies to revitalize downtowns, whether as small as a rural hamlet or as large as a metropolitan center. The emphasis is on commercial revitalization, but downtown and mixed-use redevelopment are fully ad-dressed. All of the elements of a successful program are covered, including: surveys, market analyses, public participation, access, transit, parking, pedestrians, placemaking, streetscape, facade programs, regulations, and \"main street management.\".

PLAN-713C  Downtown Economic Development  - (2 Credits)  

Downtowns are essential for a community's economic and civic health. This course explores multi-disciplinary strategies to revitalize downtowns, whether as small as a rural hamlet or as large as a metropolitan center. The emphasis is on commercial revitalization, but downtown and mixed-use redevelopment are fully addressed. All of the elements of a successful program are covered, including: surveys, market analyses, public participation, access, transit, parking, pedestrians, placemaking, streetscape, facade programs, regulations, and \"main street management.\".

PLAN-714  Social Planning  - (3 Credits)  

Utilizes planning techniques in the investigation of social problems facing communities. The major focus is cross-cutting themes, such as the social role of government, poverty, privatization, race, class, gender and ethnicity. Topical issues on the public agenda are also analyzed, incorporating issues such as welfare reform and homelessness. Specific issues and topics are selected according to students' backgrounds and interests.

PLAN-722A  Land Use & Sustainable City Form  - (3 Credits)  

Since World War II, the spreading interstate highway systems and home financing policies have created the ubiquitous American suburb. Metropolitan regions have spread out along transportation corridors absorbing the countryside in a reckless manner. In the 1970s, a new network of global cities tied together by electronic communications began to rise. Examples include command and control centers such as London, New York and Tokyo. Regional growth poles such as St. Louis, Pittsburgh, Reno and Austin began to restructure the old dichotomy between the center and the periphery - or between town and country - and to re-link cities in a new global economy. This class examines the economic, demographic, cultural and political reformulations that have transformed metropolitan areas into global cities and backwater towns into new growth centers.

PLAN-722B  Land Use Regulations  - (3 Credits)  

This course presents the nuts and bolts of land use planning as practiced in the US today and gives students the opportunity to develop/design a land use plan for a small hypothetical city. The focus is on what constitutes a comprehensive plan, principles of good plan-making, where to start, specific steps to take, information needs, and how to choose methods to accommodate a range of community situations.

PLAN-723  Contextual Urban Design Site Design  - (3 Credits)  

Especially intended for students concentrating in physical planning, this seminar provides an introduction to the basic principles, latest practices, and tools for three-dimensional visualization and analysis in site planning and design. Understanding that the context of any site is the interrelation of social, economic, historic, cultural and environmental factors, this course focuses on the physical planning of the site by drawing from contemporary practices in ecology, landscape design, zoning, energy efficiency, and resource management and bridging the disciplines of engineering, landscape design, architecture, and planning. The class provides students with both and understanding of the broader implications of site panning and the skills and tools for the planning and design of a singular site and building project.

PLAN-725A  Parks & Open Space  - (3 Credits)  

This is a lecture and workshop exploring programming, planning and design concepts of urban open space. The scope of design projects becomes progressively larger throughout the semester, starting with small recreation areas, corporate plazas and cultural facilities, and leading to the programming, planning and design of pedestrian malls, waterfront rehabilitation and civic scale plazas. In conjunction with workshop projects, lectures with illustrative material are given on the specific issues of site feasibility, site programming, site planning, and design strategies.

PLAN-725B  Placemaking for Peacemaking  - (2 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the concept of placemaking: the planning, programming, design and management of people-friendly public spaces. Students will conduct observations and an analysis of a public space, and, when possible, engage the community to elicit ideas for improvements or in hands-on volunteer activities. Readings, guest speakers and class discussions will cover the definition and significance of \"place\" and \"placemaking,\" building social capital and promoting equity through placemaking, finding economically and environmentally sustainable solutions, and the management of public spaces.

PLAN-728A  Transportation Planning  - (3 Credits)  

Provides the urban planner with a working knowledge of the concepts, technologies, and practices involved in planning, operating, and evaluating present and future urban transportation systems. While the primary focus is on technical transportation matters, technology-policy relationships are noted, complementing the fuller treatment of transportation policy in other coursework within the curriculum.

PLAN-728B  Transit Equity  - (1 Credit)  

Students examine equity issues inherent in transportation systems. The main product of the class is a paper on a case study of transportation equity issues in a specific place (a city or metropolitan region, in the U.S. or elsewhere in the world). For example, it could be an analysis of equity issues as they manifest in a specific transportation policy, approach, or mode (e.g. greenways, Transit-Oriented Development, etc.); it could be an examination of how political processes and transportation funding and policies interact (e.g. factors that might shape the next transportation authorization bill.

PLAN-728C  Pedestrians & Bicycles  - (2 Credits)  

Transportation planning is about more than just traffic counts and parking policy. This course focuses specifically on planning for pedestrians and cyclists, the importance of public spaces, street design, and public safety.

PLAN-762A  Metropolitan Regional Planning  - (3 Credits)  

An introduction to the theory and practice of metropolitan regional planning. Lectures follow the procedures and substantive components of a regional plan. Where appropriate, outside experts drawn from the region's professional pool supplement the course lectures. Students are required to evaluate a plan for a region in either the United States or abroad. This encourages familiarity with the regional planning process and allows comparisons between plans and planning theory. The student also is required to assume the role of a personality involved in a region-shaping issue. A mock public hearing is held with each student testifying as the chosen figure. Reports from the student's own perspective are required.

PLAN-764  Shrinking Cities  - (1 Credit)  

What will be the fate of America's older industrial cities industrial cities like Detroit or Buffalo, cities that have been losing jobs and population for decades? Can these cities become stronger, healthier as well as smaller places? This course will look at the reasons that these cities are shrinking, how job and population loss affect their economic and physical environment, and their prospects for the future. We will take a particular look at the reuse of urban land, and the opportunities to rethink redevelopment with green land uses as open space and urban agriculture.

PLAN-765  Planning for Disaster  - (3 Credits)  

The frequency of natural disasters has been increasing over the past two decades. Despite increased investment and advances in hazard-management technology, human and economic losses from disasters have been rising worldwide. This class provides an introduction to planning for disaster mitigation. After an overview of the changing approaches to disaster policy and planning, local and federal planning strategies will be discussed in depth around recent case studies.

PLAN-782A  International: Physical Planning  - (3 Credits)  

This course offers students the opportunity to travel abroad to study the international contexts of physical planning, including urban design, transportation, public space, infrastructure, parks and other aspects of the built environment.

PLAN-801A  Special Topics in Planning I  - (1 Credit)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-801B  Special Topics in Planning II  - (2 Credits)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-801C  Special Topics in Planning III  - (2 Credits)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-801D  Special Topics in Planning IV  - (1 Credit)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-808A  Independent Study in Planning I  - (1 Credit)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-808B  Independent Study in Planning II  - (2 Credits)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-808C  Independent Study in Planning III  - (3 Credits)  

In addition to regular course offerings, students may take up to 12 additional credits as Directed Research. Directed Research may consist of independent study on a topic of interest to the student or an extension of a regular course. Any faculty member may supervise the student.

PLAN-810  Studio: Sustainable Communities  - (5 Credits)  

The neighborhood (as defined by a number of physical, political, and socioeconomic criteria) is the level at which most planning efforts affect citizens. Increasingly, the neighborhood has also become the official focal point for city, state and federal programs in both service delivery and physical development planning and implementation. This studio introduces the student to basic techniques in neighborhood needs analysis and comprehensive planning. Utilizing a neighborhood of appropriate size and type, the students, working in teams, develop an area-wide plan (based on primary and secondary research and needs analysis) providing for residential, commercial and industrial land use and related services and infrastructure. In order to maximize the usefulness of the semester's work, as well as to provide a realistic assessment of plans produced by the studio, written and graphic materials are prepared for presentation to the \"client\" - usually a locally-based nonprofit organization representing the neighborhood under study.

PLAN-820  Studio: Land Use & Urban Design  - (5 Credits)  

This course combines basic principles and practices of city planning and urban design to a specific topical project. Physical, social, economic, cultural and political factors are considered in order to produce a workable plan and viable design. Projects are selected from actual planning/design situations in urban and/or regional contexts and require documentation and development strategies for political discourse. In addition to typical studio work, there are lectures, site visits, written reports and input from official and community representatives.

PLAN-850  Studio: Sustainable Development  - (5 Credits)  

Each semester, this studio undertakes a comprehensive land use planning study for a key piece of urban property. The study tests the physical, environmental, social and financial feasibility of developing the area for mixed urban uses. It examines the problems and opportunities that are present in the area and focuses on the development of a number of alternative plans for both short-term (three to five years) and long-term (15 years) futures. The layout, design and character of proposed housing, industry, social services and open spaces are included in the development plan, as are issues of equitable development and the creation of environmentally-sensitive sustainable communities.

PLAN-880A  Studio: International Planning & Sustainability I  - (3 Credits)  

This seminar introduces and explores in depth the urban policies and institutions of Third World nations as they relate to the nation's physical and socioeconomic development. Emphasis is on the comparative analysis of current experiences in major metropolitan areas. Planning issues, such as migration, homelessness, and the informal economy are considered in both pre- and post-industrial service societies. Experts on international planning and design are invited as guest lecturers.

PLAN-891  Directed Research  - (2 Credits)  

The demonstration of an approved scope of work showing the analytical capacities and creative skills expected of a professional planner is the capstone of the program. The demonstration can involve original research, a work-related project or an extension of course-related work. An advisory committee of faculty members judge the demonstration.

PLAN-892  Demo of Professional Competence  - (3 Credits)  

The demonstration of an approved scope of work showing the analytical capacities and creative skills expected of a professional planner is the capstone of the program. The demonstration can involve original research, a work-related project or an extension of course-related work. An advisory committee of faculty members judge the demonstration.

PLAN-893  Professional Competence in Progress  - (0 Credits)  

If the Demonstration of Professional Competence is not completed in the initial semesters, students can continue working in PLAN-700 for no more than five semesters.

PLAN-9600  Internship  - (0 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a structure for experiential learning through an internship program. This course allows for career development through internships with a pre-internship preparation (workshop), professional search and selection of internship (through Internship Faculty counseling and career counselor advisement), an on-going live and/or virtual forum to discuss the internship & assignments centered around observation, professional growth & career investigation.

PLAN-9601  Internship  - (1 Credit)  

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a structure for experiential learning through an internship program. This course allows for career development through internships with a pre-internship preparation (workshop), professional search and selection of internship (through internship Faculty counseling and career Counselor advisement), an on-going live and/or virtual forum to discuss the internship & assignments centered around observation, professional growth & career investigation.

PLAN-9602  Internship  - (2 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a structure for experiential learning through an internship program. This course allows for career development through internships with a pre-internship preparation (workshop), professional search and selection of internship (through internship Faculty counseling and career Counselor advisement), an on-going live and/or virtual forum to discuss the internship & assignments centered around observation, professional growth & career investigation.

PLAN-9603  Internship  - (3 Credits)  

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a structure for experiential learning through an internship program. This course allows for career development through internships with a pre-internship preparation (workshop), professional search and selection of internship (through internship Faculty counseling and career Counselor advisement), an on-going live and/or virtual forum to discuss the internship & assignments centered around observation, professional growth & career investigation.