Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Historic Preservation (PR)

PR-600  Current Issues in Historic Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

Current Issues in Historic Preservation is a five week seminar (1 credit) taught in a lecture/discussion format with a goal to expose Historic Preservation and other students to the challenges facing practitioners and academicians in the field of preservation today.

PR-601  Directed Research  - (1 Credit)  

This course is intended for students who wish to do independent research at a graduate level in a subject of their choice and acceptable to the graduate faculty and the chairperson.

PR-631  Project Management  - (1 Credit)  

Today historic preservation professionals find themselves engaged in overseeing projects that require not only strong preservation disciplines but strong project management disciplines. The class will examine the fundamentals of project management and its adaptability to a broad base of historic preservation projects regardless of type or size. The methodology of Project Planning and Estimation will evaluate the use of templates in creating repeatable processes that can be easily ported to project management software. The value of project management methodologies will be examined through a case study.

PR-640  History and Theory of Preservation  - (3 Credits)  

Explores the basic concept of \"What is Historic Preservation?\" through a study of the route preservation has taken to reach the place it is today. The course presents both the historic development of preservation and the theoretical and philosophical foundations of that development. It then raises some of the fundamental issues concerning the values, assumptions, and practice of historic preservation.

PR-641  Documentation/Interpretation  - (3 Credits)  

Introduces the student to methods of documenting and interpreting the built environment, emphasizing hands-on involvement through the analysis of a neighborhood in New York City. It stresses research methodology, using library resources, public records, maps, historic documents, images, oral histories, and folklore. The class focuses on the documentation of a New York City neighborhood selected by the instructor with the collaboration of the historic preservation faculty. Historical data is collected throughout the first half of the semester, and students work collaboratively to assemble a comprehensive story of the development of the entire study area. During the second half of the semester, students collect oral histories and folklore from residents of the study area, and explore the interpretations of the history that was uncovered.

PR-642A  Concepts of Heritage  - (3 Credits)  

All historic preservation efforts take place within the context of accepted definitions of heritage. These definitions have changed dramatically over time; they vary from country to country, and are contested even within the contemporary United States. This course provides a historical and critical introduction to concepts of heritage. The class will be conducted as a seminar, with emphasis on close reading of texts and intensive discussion. Students also have an opportunity to write a research paper on a subject related to current issues in the policy, politics, or philosophy of heritage conservation.

PR-643A  Architecture & Urban History: U.S. States  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores through lectures and readings the history of world American architecture and urban/city development highlighting the social, cultural, and technological changes that influenced both. It is conceptualized, framed and presented for students studying Historic Preservation. It assumes that students have little familiarity with history of architecture or the city and therefore places emphasis on architectural styles in the context of the development of the city. This course is the second in a two-part series that chronologically covers the broad sweep of the history of world architecture and city development (though each course may be taken independently).

PR-643B  Architecture & Urban History: Europe Middle East, Asia  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores through lectures and readings the history of world architecture and urban/city development. It is conceptualized, framed and presented for students studying Historic Preservation. It assumes that students have little familiarity with history of architecture or the city and therefore places emphasis on architectural styles in the context of the development of the city. This course is the first in a two-part series that chronologically covers the broad sweep of the history of world architecture and city development. The second semester will focus on the architecture and urban form of the Americas with special emphasis on the United States.

PR-651  Building Technology  - (3 Credits)  

The student learns to look at an existing building to understand and evaluate its performance and to develop the necessary repair and restoration technologies. Typical restoration problems of various building types are studied with case studies involving actual restorations of historic buildings.

PR-652A  Adaptations and Alterations of Historic Landmarks  - (3 Credits)  

Students study the complex issue of changing historic structures and structures within historic districts. New construction, alterations, and additions present preservationists with many challenges, including questions of appropriateness that involve regulatory issues, aesthetics, and preservation philosophy. Adaptive re-use is a related issue, often requiring alterations, but even when it does not change the exterior of a building, the perception of the building can be dramatically changed.

PR-661  Preservation Law & Policy  - (3 Credits)  

Provide a working understanding of the legal underpinnings of landmark regulation in the United States and its implications, as well as interrelationships between historic preservations and public policy. It raises some of the fundamental issues concerning the values, assumptions, and practice of historic preservation.

PR-670A  Real Estate Development  - (1 Credit)  

The purpose of this course is to (1) introduce the tools a developer uses in order decide whether to undertake a project and (2) explore the public policy implications of the developer's perspective. It is the presumption of this course that good public policy requires harnessing the wealth maximizing instincts and objectives of the developer and that, too often, public policy disregards or undermines these instincts and objectives.

PR-670B  Real Estate Market Analysis  - (1 Credit)  

This course provides an overview of the fundamentals of real estate market analysis. The class will consider the general purposes and forms of real estate analysis and will explore in depth some of the specific challenges and approaches to analysis supply and demand for specific real estate product types.

PR-670C  Preservation Tax Credit Projects  - (1 Credit)  

This course examines all aspects of historic preservation tax credit projects, from the application process to a detailed summary of the National Register Criteria for Evaluation and the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation. The course will also review the planning, structuring and pricing of historic tax credit investments from a tax and finanacial point of view, and will give students insight into the role of the historic preservation consultant in real estate development project.

PR-711  Neighborhood Preservation Zoning  - (1 Credit)  

This course provides an introduction to neighborhood preservation issues both in New York City and in other municipalities across the United States. The proliferation of conservation district ordinances will be examined, along with their administration. To provide local context, we will look at the evolution of zoning as a development tool in New York City. A variety of approaches to land use controls that emphasize protecting the integrity of neighborhoods will be discussed.

PR-712A  Main Street Revitalization  - (1 Credit)  

The traditional commercial shopping street, whether it is in an urban neighborhood or is the Main Street in a small or large village, represents the heart of a community's economic and social life. As such, it represents a critical area of concern for those involved in the practice of historic preservation, planning, architecture and urban design. Commercial or Downtown Revitalization covers a broad spectrum of issues, including all matters of design (urban design, public space design, graphics, etc.), preservation, planning, organization, economic development, promotion, marketing, retailing, and building a working relationship with all members of the public and private community.

PR-713  Design & Conservation of Historic Landscapes  - (2 Credits)  

Designed landscape is all around is in the form of public spaces in cities, parks and private gardens. But gardens and designed open space are the most ephemeral of man's three-dimensional creations, and without care and maintenance, they quickly disappear. We seldom think of these places as \"historic\", or view them in terms of Historic Preservation. In this class we explore first hand a diverse sampling of some of the most compelling historic public spaces, parks and gardens in New York City and its environs, discussing how they were designed and built, as well as the issues of maintaining and preserving these spaces, the unique challenges of conservation and restoration, and in some cases, their re-use.

PR-714  Heritage Interpretation  - (2 Credits)  

Heritage interpretation is an expanding and increasingly complex field. The discourse that shapes the construction and communication of historical significance and other cultural values is an integral part of historic preservation practice. But this discourse is not limited to traditional historic sites, and extends beyond historic preservation to a range of other fields, including public history and public art. The process of defining, sharing, or challenging an understanding of cultural significance shapes our experience of place, of community, and of identity. This course provides students with an introduction to the range of interpretive theory and practice, as well as an opportunity to engage directly with the interpretive process.

PR-715  Museums as Historic Structures  - (1 Credit)  

This 5-week course provides students with an introduction to significant questions faces by art museums housed in historic structures; the answers different museums have proposed; and the eventual solutions negotiated by stakeholders. Classes are held at Pratt and in museums throughout New York City. Specific questions related to how museums have expanded (or not) as their collections have grown and changed; how they have adapted their structures (or not) to house art in developing media; what city-wide or neighborhood concerns were addressed in these processed; and how these specific experiences have influenced the broader philosophical nature of museums today.

PR-716  Policy Analysis for Historic Preservation  - (2 Credits)  

Policy Analysis for Historic Preservation is designed to help students focus their thinking on preservation issues through research, analysis, discussion, presentation and writing. Throughout the semester students will identify an array of contemporary preservation policy issues, look for information and data that informs their understanding of these issues, and develop methods of assessing potential ways to resolve them. The focus of these activities is giving the student an opportunity to engage in critical thinking: taking in facts and opinions, considering various alternatives to resolve contentious issues, weighing the impacts of the alternatives, understanding the benefits and potential harms of negotiated \"trade-offs\", and arriving at a recommendation.

PR-718  Reuse Redevelopment of Historic Buildings  - (2 Credits)  

This course provides a survey of the components that go into the reuse and redevelopment of historic building. These include: building typologies, adaptability of those typologies to uses other than that for which the buildings were designed, the significance of risk form undisclosed conditions and discretionary review, market studies and viability, real estate economics and viability, the incentives to promote reuse and redevelopment, and how to promote enlightened self-interest to achieve preservation objectives.

PR-749A  Special Topics in Preservation  - (1 Credit)  

This course is intended for students who wish to do independent research at a graduate level in a subject of their choice and acceptable to the graduate faculty and the chairperson.

PR-749B  Special Topics in Preservation 2  - (2 Credits)  

This course is intended for students who wish to do independent research at a graduate level in a subject of their choice and acceptable to the graduate faculty and the chairperson.

PR-749C  Special Topics in Preservation 3  - (3 Credits)  

This course is intended for students who wish to do independent research at a graduate level in a subject of their choice and acceptable to the graduate faculty and the chairperson.

PR-761  Public History  - (3 Credits)  

The field of public history offers a rich set of tools and strategies for historic preservationists. This course will introduce students to methods and approaches, gaining familiarity with historical methodology including the development of historical theme, context, and narrative as well as the use of oral history, material culture, and folklore to gain deeper understanding of place history and significance. It will also explore the ways in which interpretive strategies can be employed to engage and connect with public audiences.

PR-781  International Conservation  - (1 Credit)  

This class provides students with an overview of key elements in international preservation. We look at the work of leading organizations and contemporary case studies to demonstrate how approaches, goals, and sustainable strategies vary. International Charters will be addressed as well as the World Heritage process from Indicative and Tentatative listings to Inscription or At Risk designation. Sustainability, tourism, Modernism, and changing landscapes are also themes that are explored through discussions in class.

PR-839  Historic Preservation Studio I: Heritage Documentation  - (5 Credits)  

The class focuses on the documentation of a New York City neighborhood selected by the instructor with the collaboration of the historic preservation faculty. Studio I is the central focus of the second semester and builds upon the many skills acquired by students in their first semester. This means that history, theory, law, planning, building technology, and materials are all part of the documentation process of the area that students will focus on. This course introduces the student to methods of documenting and interpreting the built environment, emphasizing hands-on involvement through the analysis of a neighborhood in New York City. It stresses research methodology, using library resources, public records, maps, historic documents, images, oral histories, and folklore as well as the interpretation of those findings. Its main goal is to provide students the necessary skills that will allow them to read and document buildings from several different perspectives, such as history, design, material, and evolution through time, through the use of the many tools that are available to preservationists. Studio I provides an important foundation that will be built upon in Studio II. This course also allows students to apply their theoretical knowledge and practice in a real-world setting.

PR-840  Historic Preservation Studio II: Preservation, Economic Development  - (5 Credits)  

This studio is the program's culmination and provides an opportunity for students to bring together an array of skills and knowledge to address a specific set of challenges based on New York neighborhoods and current issues. The studio begins with classroom and field study and includes meetings with experts and community representatives. This phase of the course is intended to ground students in the neighborhood's history, urban fabric, and current issues. This provides a solid foundation for the second phase, in which the students work in teams under the guidance of an interdisciplinary group of faculty advisors to address the major preservation issues that have been presented. The second phase is carried out under conditions that are intended to simulate the actual conditions of professional practice within the studio context. Students work in multidisciplinary teams and are responsible to private, government, or non-profit clients. Exercises include resource assessments; development analyses; preservation plans; legal, regulatory, and political strategy; and preparing written reports and graphics. The studio ends with students presenting their work to the public.

PR-891  Thesis I  - (2 Credits)  

The Historic Preservation Thesis is the capstone project for students in the MSHP degree program at Pratt. To receive the degree, students must demonstrate the ability to undertake a major preservation project or study, conduct original research and analysis, and engage in dialogue about their project with faculty and professionals from the historic preservation field.

PR-892  Thesis II  - (2 Credits)  

The demonstration of an approved scope of work showing the analytical capacities and creative skills expected of a professional preservationist is the capstone of the program. The demonstration can involve original research, a work-related project or extension of course-related work. An advisory committee of faculty members judge the thesis during the semester.