Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Humanities and Media Studies (HMS)

HMS-500B  Topics in Literary Studies: Faith in Fiction: Religious Currents in the 20th Century Novel  - (3 Credits)  

This course covers a range of authors whose fictional works involve questions of modern religious faith. Novels exploring aspects of Eastern theology, mysticism and Catholicism are investigated for their spiritual responses to contemporary social and political events and conditions, as well as for their stylistic elements.

HMS-500S  Special Topics in Literary Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-501S  SPT: Modern/Contemporary Literature/ Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in modern and contemporary literature and culture in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-503S  Special Topics in World Literature and Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in world literature and culture in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-530S  Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary and cultural theory in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-531S  Special Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary and cultural studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. <html> <body> <a href=\"http://tinyurl.com/jm9g3ww\" target=\"new\">Detailed descriptions for Special Topics Courses</a> </body> </html>

HMS-540E  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: The Poetics of Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

This course investigates relationships between image and narrative in cinema. Weekly creative assignments-- informed by close readings of film excerpts and text-- will culminate in the design of a short, poetic film project. We will view visionary work by innovative filmmakers, and engage in close reading, followed by active discussion, to deepen our understanding of artistic choices-- in the use of metaphor, point of view, association, montage, image/action, frame, composition, time, space, kinetics, transformation, multiple perspectives, reflexivity, gesture and the body, non-linear narrative, amongst others-- in the act of visual storytelling central to the cinematic enterprise.

HMS-540F  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Women In International Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

This course considers the vision of prominent and pioneering films, with particular attention to the gaze, subjectivity, ambivalence, multiplicity of perspective, identification and disruption, as cinematic vocabulary and subject. We will look at films-- in the works of artists such as Agnes Varda, Lois Weber, Claire Denis, Marguerite Duras and Alain Renais, Julie Taymor, Susanna Bier, Rainer Fassbinder, Wong Kar Wai, Ang Lee and Todd Haynes-- with an emphasis on identity, sexuality and gender.

HMS-540G  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Semiotics of Media: Deleuze, Cinema and Beyond  - (3 Credits)  

This class will explore the semiotics of cinema as elaborated by Deleuze in his books Cinema 1 and Cinema 2. Deleuze develops a taxonomy of cinematic signs that displaces both linguistic-based semiotics and psychoanalytic approaches. How can we extend Deleuze's categories to incorporate innovations in digital and new media?

HMS-540H  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Film Theory in Practice  - (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to some of the key concepts in the history of film and media theory. However, rather than merely reading about these theories, students will also experiment with and apply these theories in practical exercises involving writing, photography, video and other media.

HMS-540I  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Film Sound  - (3 Credits)  

Is film a visual medium? This course explores some of the theoretical concerns in designing the sound of a film, including the creation of soundtracks, the use of original scoring, and voiceovers.

HMS-540J  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Key Concepts in Net Art  - (3 Credits)  

Net Art is an interdisciplinary field with roots in a number of other practices -- conceptual art, performance art, video art, video games, poetry, and mail art, to name a few. We will study works of art on the internet and the practices of making and presenting art that precede them. Alongside works of art and art criticism, we will read works about the nature of the Internet as a medium. Key concepts include: transmission, narration/narrative, presence, interactivity, identity, instrument, gaming, digital vs. analog, medium and mediation.

HMS-540S  Special Topics in Cinema and Media Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cinema and media studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. <html> <body> <a href=\"http://tinyurl.com/jm9g3ww\" target=\"new\">Detailed descriptions for Special Topics Courses</a> </body> </html>

HMS-541A  Global Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

In iconic films selected from contemporary global cinema, we will examine how the invention of new cinematic language is used to evoke poignant insight into human experience, and potentially influence our perceptions of reality. Modules organized by genre will consist of screenings, supplemented by guest filmmaker(s), seminar discussions, readings, research and student creative projects.

HMS-549A  Media Studies Encounters 1  - (1 Credit)  

Media Studies Encounters 1, offered during Fall Semester, gives students a program of events, including speakers, films, presentations, performances, outings, and various other activities designed to introduce a widely varied set of media practices and theories in an informal setting. Discussions will also be held during weeks in which events are not scheduled. Some ongoing writing is required, but because the course is only for one credit, it will only meet for eight sessions at various points throughout the semester.

HMS-549B  Media Studies Encounters 2  - (1 Credit)  

Media Studies Encounters 2, offered during Spring Semester, gives students a program of events, including speakers, films, presentations, performances, outings, and various other activities designed to introduce a widely varied set of media practices and theories in an informal setting. Discussions will also be held during weeks in which events are not scheduled. Some ongoing writing is required, but because the course is only for one credit, it will only meet for eight sessions at various points throughout the semester.

HMS-560S  Special Topics in Performance & Performance Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in performance and performance studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-590A  Topics in Music: Electro-Acoustic Music  - (3 Credits)  

This course acquaints students with the history of electronics in music/audio art, gives them some measure of technical competence with current tools in analog and digital audio, and presents them with exercises that will promote original, creative work.

HMS-590B  Topics in Music: The Idea of Black  - (3 Credits)  

Do we know black music when we hear it? When we hear it as part of narrative (ie: in film, opera, or commercials), how does black music function symbolically? What challenges does sound pose to the accepted wisdom in semiotics? In addition to listening to music by black performers and composers, we will be reading critical works about music across fields such as musicology, film theory, black studies, and literature.

HMS-590S  SPT: Music & Sound Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in music and sound studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes. <html> <body> <a href=\"http://tinyurl.com/jm9g3ww\" target=\"new\">Detailed descriptions for Special Topics Courses</a> </body> </html>

HMS-591A  Topics in Transdisciplinary Studies: Contemporary Artist's Book in Historical and Theoretical Contexts  - (3 Credits)  

This course develops critical frameworks for interpreting and creating artists' books; that is, artworks in which the book is a medium. We will study such books alongside histories of the field, theoretical writings, and critical commentaries. These studies will inform our endeavors to create, catalogue, and/or critique artists? books in which visual, verbal, and material elements are interwoven. Advanced students from various fields are encouraged to use and expand their own disciplinary perspectives. Visits to collections around New York City will supplement Pratt's resources.

HMS-592A  Animation Narrative Historical and Theoretical Contexts  - (3 Credits)  

This course focuses on the fundamentals of narrative theory and practice, with an emphasis on how to employ strong narrative elements in visual work, especially animation and film, and on translating theory into practice. As a starting point, the course examines traditional stories and their underlying structures, looking closely at ancient mythologies from various world cultures and the common narrative elements they share, while comparing visual representations that correspond to these elements. The course advances to less traditional narrative structures (i.e. nonlinear, antiheroic, sensory, etc.), the more complex and often abstract visual representations these structures have evoked, and the narrative theories that engage them.

HMS-600S  Special Topics in Literary Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary studies in an intensive graduate seminar setting. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-630A  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: How To Represent History: Art, Literature, Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course will focus on analyzing how contemporary artists and those that write about their work, engage with the problems and possibilities of representing history. Students will investigate the various ways contemporary artists attempt to engage with and represent history. When do artists look to the past and for what artistic, critical, and political purposes? What does artwork that engages history tell us about how history can be thought, represented, imagined? What does contemporary art tell us about the relationships among history, images, and visual culture?

HMS-630S  Spt: Literary/Cultural Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary and cultural theory in an intensive graduate seminar setting. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-631S  Special Topics in Cultural Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cultural studies in an intensive graduate seminar setting. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-640S  Special Topics in Cinema and Media Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore particular special topics in cinema/media studies in a intensive graduate seminar setting. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-650A  Mediologes I  - (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the logics of mediation in their varied forms, including print, visual (photography, cinema, video), audio, technological, and social forms of media.

HMS-650B  Mediologes II  - (3 Credits)  

This course will build on the work of Mediologies I, introducing students to methods of interpreting a variety of media objects/artifacts ? books, photographs, films, everyday objects, video games, web-sites, sounds/music, and other specific artifacts of media process ? while situating these objects in relation to critical, social, historical, and cultural contexts.

HMS-659A  Media Studies Final Project/Thesis  - (4 Credits)  

This course will work to help students prepare for the production of a final project or thesis. The class will be run as a workshop for student work, facilitated by a faculty member. Studentswill engage with readings on the topic of producing a final project or thesis; examine relevant critical texts as well as workshop the process of selecting a thesis advisor; assemble an annotated bibliography, a precis and literature review; prepare outlines and preliminary or preparatory statements of purpose, and begin the work at hand. Instructor and peers will respond to work in progress and help the student reach the point at which they can take the project or thesis to fruition during the class semester, or in the following semester.

HMS-659B  Media Studies Thesis in Progress  - (0 Credits)  

This course is for students who have taken the Media Studies Final Project/Thesis Workshop and are in the process of producing a final project/thesis.

HMS-661A  Race, Gender, Internet  - (3 Credits)  

As the Internet and social media pervade our daily lives and social relationships, it is crucial that we understand what norms and value are embedded within the technologies we engage with every day. This course understands the Internet as something more than just a means with which to communicate and share information. As students will learn, it is as much a technological form as it is a set of social, cultural economic, and technological relationships. In the course, we will examine how race, gender, and difference more broadly are embedded in the design, operations, and accessibility of the Internet.

HMS-663A  Postcoloniality and Aesthetics  - (3 Credits)  

Through film, dramatic texts, performance, visual art, and theory, this course will explore the legacies of colonialism, as well as the sites of exclusion and exploitation created by global capital today. We will ask how aesthetic tools may challenge binary systems of value (first World/Third World, developed/underdeveloped, center/periphery) and allow for the emergence of art and politics of \"borderlands\" and \"in-between worlds.\" We will begin by delving into the discourses, film and performance works of prominent artists (circa 1960s-1960s) of independent nations of Asia and Africa to understand the distinguishing characteristics of postcolonial aesthetic praxis (canonical counter-discourses, non-linear temporality, carnival logics, and various \"languages\" of resistance-hybridity, folklore, silence, rhythm etc.) We will also study the relationships between art and memory following years of sustained political violence and dictatorship in Latin American. Then we will turn our attention to more recent works of performance and theory from within the US/North America engaging Black feminist theory/The Movement for Black Lives and indigenous resurgence. Course materials includes reading and artworks by such global, interdisciplinary scholars and artists as Trinh T. Minh-ha, Aimé and Suzanne Césaire, Edward Said, Frantz Fanon, Amir Baradaran Solanas, Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Manjula Padmanabhan, Zanele Muholi, amongst others.

HMS-672A  Bodies, Technology, Visuality  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines how a wide range of technologies form early film lighting technologies to cosmetics to algorithms shape the ways bodies are visualized and represented. The focus on the intertwined relationships of bodies and visual technologies will enable students to understand the social, cultural, and political implications of technological designs and operations.

HMS-693A  Writing as Photography Recuperative Strategies  - (3 Credits)  

This graduate course explores ways in which a range of poetic and critical writing can recreate and investigate innovative and rigorous modes of photography. Writing and photography are at a point of potential interchangeability, where both are tools for utilitarian communication and poetic forms. This course will enact the historic and contemporary overlap between writing and photography in methodology and effect. Class time be will be split between seminar style discussions, at time led by graduate students, on extensive weekly readings and workshops on writing exercises in poetry and critical essays.

HMS-694A  Conceptual Art/Writing Practices & Recuperative Strategies  - (3 Credits)  

In this conceptual art-and-writing course, students will design, carry out, and document a \"cultural expedition\" designed to recuperate cultural lineages, dimensions of experience, and kinds of knowledge that are at risk of being lost. We will explore how poetics can expand our notions of sustainability to include cultural recovery and reanimation and we will learn to use specific writing and investigative (action-based) procedures, such as sustained liking practices, note-taking and commonplace books, audio recording and transcription, archive assembly and investigation, and site-specific research and performance. Be ready to step out of the classroom and into a more flexible, open, and versatile way of looking at writing, at the past, and at how we can, out of that past, construct a more diverse and desired world.

HMS-696A  Writing for Art and Design Practice  - (1 Credit)  

This course is a one credit, graduate-level writing workshop designed to teach artist how to write through and about artistic practice. Through a series of readings and exercises, students are provided with creative approaches to meet writing required of them in school and more generally. Students will read and write about visual art, design, dance, money, news and politics, science, poetry. They will also write first person essays and collaborative texts about their own practice of making. Students will complete weekly assignments and cooperatively review work in class. For a final assignment, students will prepare a writing portfolio that includes a revised artists statement, reading journals and essay that makes textual citation to the course reader and outside texts. Students will be given the opportunity and support to publish their writing portfolios as an artist's book.

HMS-9600  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (0 Credits)  

This course allows Media Studies MA Students to work as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths, and for the internship to appear on their transcripts. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the internship Coordinator.

HMS-9601  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (1 Credit)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the internship Coordinator.

HMS-9602  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (2 Credits)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the Internship Coordinator.

HMS-9603  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (3 Credits)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the Internship Coordinator.

HMS-9701  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (1 Credit)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the internship Coordinator.

HMS-9702  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (2 Credits)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the Internship Coordinator.

HMS-9703  Media Studies Internship Workshop  - (3 Credits)  

This course allows Media Studies MA students to work, for academic credit, as interns in venues relevant to their studies and career paths. The proposed assignment and a specific program of hours and supervision have to be approved by the Internship Coordinator.