Academic Catalog 2020-2021

Humanities and Media Studies (HMS)

HMS-101A  Literary and Critical Studies I  - (3 Credits)  

This class serves as an introduction to reading and writing about literary texts and critical theory, with a concentration on composition, critical analysis, and research. Students are required to write essays based on the critical analysis of texts across a range of genres. Emphasis is placed on using writing as an extension of the thought and creative process, and as a tool that can be integrated across academic and artistic disciplines. There will be a focus on mastering the elements of the thesis-centered essay and developing research skills.

HMS-101B  Literary and Critical Studies for Architecture Students I  - (3 Credits)  

This class serves as an introduction to literature, composition, critical analysis, and research for architecture students. Students are required to write essays based on the critical analysis of texts across a range of genres. Emphasis is placed on using writing as an extension of the thought process, and as a tool that can be integrated across academic and artistic disciplines. Stress is placed on mastering the elements of the thesis-centered essay and developing research skills. This course is open ONLY to Architecture students.

HMS-200B  Advanced Literary and Critical Studies For Architecture Students I  - (3 Credits)  

This course enables registered Architecture students who have completed their first-semester Freshman English requirement to take an advanced writing-intensive class linked to their first-semester design studio. All first year students, regardless of status, will register in the following semester in HMS 201B.

HMS-201A  Literary and Critical Studies II  - (3 Credits)  

While students continue to deepen and refine the critical thinking and writing skills required in 101A, emphasis is places on exploring literary and visual texts in historical and cultural contexts and in their myriad relations to critical theory. Students will also continue to develop and refine a writing style characterized by coherency, clarity of expression, analytical rigor, and personal style. The course will culminate in an independent research project that helps to point students toward their further focused studies.

HMS-201B  Literary and Critical Stud for Arch St Studies for Architects II  - (3 Credits)  

This introductory seminar is in correspondence with your architectural design studio and is intended to help you challenge and develop your ideas about the relationship between space, the body and the built environment, as well as to give your practice in both articulating these ideas and relating them to the context, syntax and intention of your architectural investigations in the studio. In this seminar, as a way of building on the work you did in HMS 101B, we'll broaden the understanding of the form of language your developed in that class by engaging with a variety of texts to help you examine the content of language out it the world and its place in architecture. We will begin by developing distinctions between the notion of language and culture and explore the understanding that language is performative, produced through representation, perception and experience of the material environment, and mediated through many different forces (cultural, symbolic, social). The emphasis of the second semester course is on post colonial theory and critical race theory. As a way to feed these explorations, we will study texts from a range of fields such as literature, film, criticism, science, philosophy, architecture, and cultural theory, and then create a conversation between these texts and your own ideas through a variety of writing challenges. The pace of the seminar allows for greater reflexivity and thoughtful construction of ideas that are presented in the studio. In many ways, the literary and critical studies seminar is the nodal point for all of the other courses in the architecture program; it is in the seminar that you will learn to practice reflexivity through speaking, performance and writing. We will divide our work into three units, each of which requires you to focus on a different medium and a different type of academic writing; as the final project of each unit, you will produce a written essay that engages with both a primary text (such as a novel, a film, a work of architecture or your own final project in the architectural design studio) and the theoretical/critical; texts and concepts we have discussed during the semester. In each unit, you will first complete a series of pre-draft assignments form which you will develop (and substantially revise) an essay; for the research assignment of the course, you will produce a ten-page essay. At the end of the term you will turn in a complete portfolio with all of the essays you have produced this semester, and a reflection on the revisions of the essays.

HMS-203A  World Literature Survey I  - (3 Credits)  

This course investigates major literary works of mythology, epic poetry, drama, fable and religious poetry from around the world, extending from the Mesopotamian period to the early 17th Century. These works are examined within their specific literary and historical contexts.

HMS-203B  World Literature Survey II  - (3 Credits)  

This course investigates major literary works of poetry, prose and drama from around the world from the 17th Century to the present. These works are examined within their specific literary and historical contexts.

HMS-203C  International Novels Survey  - (3 Credits)  

Important novels from African, Asian, and Latin American cultures introduce vivid lives, moral issues and aesthetic values which differ from those in the Euro-American tradition but which show common passions and problems. Films, guest speakers, and field trips enlarge cultural perspectives. Writing encourages comparative research and personal involvement.

HMS-205A  Survey of African-American Culture  - (3 Credits)  

Survey of African-American Culture explores the art generated by women and men of African descent in the United States and the Caribbean. We will explore archetypes and stereotypes, themes of flight and return, of assimilation and resistance and seek to uncover the meaning and substance of voices resisting silence.

HMS-208A  Medieval Literature and Culture: A Survey  - (3 Credits)  

Since the term \"Middle Ages\" is burdened with designating one thousand years of history (c.500-1500), this course will provide a necessarily limited overview of a few major literary, philosophical, religious, and aesthetic issues that defined the period in Western Europe. Literary and philosophical texts will be situated within the historic, aesthetic, social, and intellectual contexts in which they emerged in order to provide a sense of the specific trends that characterized shorter periods within the medieval era. The trends to be studied will vary each semester the course is taught.

HMS-208B  Early Modern Literature and Culture: A Survey  - (3 Credits)  

This course provides an overview of the roots of modern Western culture and its global engagements. The goal is to provide the student with a grasp of the range of historical, philosophical, and literary issues raised by early modern texts and images produced prior to 1700. It aims to move the student towards an appreciation of the alterity of this period, and thus of the contingency of ways of thinking and creating that we take for granted in the modern era.

HMS-215  Writing for the Professional  - (3 Credits)  

Students learn effective business communication. The use of professional language and the principles of organization are stressed in the resume, cover letter, proposal, letter of refusal, memo, presentation and research report and other documents. The course also includes a focus on the electronic workplace and professional communication norms related to the workplace.

HMS-221B  Advanced Literary and Critical Studies For Architecture Students II  - (3 Credits)  

This course enables registered Architecture students who have completed 220B and who have credit for their second-semester Freshman English requirement to take an advanced writing-intensive class linked to their second-semester design studio.

HMS-225A  Introduction to Journalism  - (3 Credits)  

This course teaches basic techniques of journalism, including research, interviewing, fact-checking and ethics-all in the context of readings in the history of journalism and under the guidance of an experienced professional. Students research and write basic news stories and profiles and generate story ideas, with encouragement to pursue suitable outlets for publication. Classroom instruction and writing assignments are supplemented with field trips and guest lectures from professional journalists. The course is a preferred elective for Writing Program students.

HMS-225B  Introduction to Feature Writing  - (3 Credits)  

This class will provide a hands-on introduction to newspaper and magazine reporting, with a focus on writing a wide array of feature articles-among them news features, profiles, reviews and human interest pieces.

HMS-230A  Literary Criticism and Theory Survey  - (3 Credits)  

The status of literature - its meaning, structure, truth value, and social function - has proven, throughout history, to be surprisingly controversial, and has generated endless commentary. This class provides a survey of the field of literary criticism and theory from Antiquity to the present. Texts are drawn from a range of theoretical schools or movements, including formalism, structuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism, feminism and gender studies, sexuality studies, deconstruction, and post-structuralism. While the course focuses on literary criticism, connections are also made to art criticism and intellectual history.

HMS-231B  Introduction to the New Testament and its Cultural Setting  - (3 Credits)  

This introductory, nonsectarian course includes extensive readings from a modern English translation of the New Testament; plus a supplementary text, media presentations, lecture-discussions, and a field trip. We explore contributions from many disciplines that relate to biblical scholarship (e.g., history, archeology, linguistics) in order to more fully understand the texts in their original cultural settings. Students do additional research (e.g., on art influenced by the New Testament, on controversies rooted in the New Testament, etc.), write papers, and present their findings in class.

HMS-232A  Introductory Topics in Horror and Monstrosity  - (3 Credits)  

This course will serve as a general introduction to the issues of horror, monstrosity, and the abject in literature, film, and theory. Topics may include: the uncanny, the fantastic, catharsis, the sublime, the gaze, liminality, trauma, return of the repressed, projection, splitting, Freud's analysis of dreams, the gothic, etc. Materials will include historical materials, literary texts by authors such as Hoffman, Kafka, Gilman, etc., and films by Wiener, Hitchcock, Powell, Romero, Polansky, Argento, Barker, Scott, Jeunet, Gans, Park, etc. Specific texts and films may vary.

HMS-240A  Introduction to the Critical Analysis Of Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to the history, analytic concepts, and critical vocabulary necessary for understanding cinema as a major cultural form of the 20th century. You will be invited to see cinema as a dynamic and international art form that has evolved in response to its own history, that of the other arts, and wider historical, political, technological, and economic contexts. The goal of this class is to serve as an introduction both to film history and to how to think, write, and talk about films as media of cultural praxis.

HMS-261A  Introduction to Public Speaking and Interpersonal Communication  - (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to effective public speaking as well as effective communication in small groups. All students will develop, organize, and deliver several types of speeches; study in workshop form the dynamics of various interpersonal communication situations, such as conflict management, job interviews, body language, and cross-cultural exchanges; and improve critiquing and listening skills. Students will complete research papers and lead mini-workshops about further aspects of interpersonal communication.

HMS-262A  Introduction to Acting  - (3 Credits)  

This class enables students to develop fundamental acting skills including voice, movement, expression, imagination, character development, trust and relaxation.

HMS-290A  Sound Across the Arts  - (3 Credits)  

This course is an introduction to sound across the arts. Students will encounter works created in the fields of experimental music, sound art, sound installation, film sound, and audio literature. We will discuss the project, techniques, theories, and other intersections between and among the creative contexts for artists working in the medium of sound.

HMS-291B  Intro to Transdisciplinary Writing I Writing I  - (1 Credit)  

This one-credit writing workshop provides an introduction to language formation across the disciplines. By adapting principles from the philosophy of language, students will learn to locate a material language that corresponds with their making process at one within and beyond the discipline of architecture. In weekly assignments, students will develop new forms of language making, text-image and performance practices in relationship to a studio project.

HMS-292B  Intro to Transdisciplinary Writing II Writing II  - (1 Credit)  

This one-credit writing course provides an introduction to language formations across the disciplines. Expanding the curriculum of HMS 291B, this course enables students to develop a material language in negotiation with the social and political dimensions of their mediation processes and representational logics into a public, performance dimension. For a final assignment, students will assemble a text-image based project that locates their project in a social and political context.

HMS-300A  Topics in Literary Studies: Children's Literature  - (3 Credits)  

A (selective) survey of 300 years of books written for children, with particular emphasis on the idea of childhood as implicit in the texts and (sometimes) explicit in the illustrations. Students may approach the course as critics or as (potential) creators - i.e. writers/illustrators.

HMS-300B  Topics in Literary Studies: The Literature of Popular Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course investigates how works of the 20th Century literary sub-genres of science, western, romance, horror and detective fiction reflect in their familiar stylistic conventions popular national myths, gender stereotypes and other prevailing social and political perspectives.

HMS-300D  Topics in Literary Studies: Satire  - (3 Credits)  

Students study satire, a literary mode that blends social criticism with humor and wit to the end that human institutions or humanity may be improved. The range of readings is from Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Petronius' The Satyricon, to contemporary fiction and works such as Maus.

HMS-300S  SPT: Literary Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-301A  Topics in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture: Modernist Literatures  - (3 Credits)  

This course will serve as a general introduction to the various literatures and literary cultures which came about due to the massive cultural dislocations of the early twentieth century. Topics may include: theories of modernism and modernity, stream of consciousness, literary montage, fragmentation, alienation, literary expressionism, Harlem Renaissance, queer modernisms, etc. Authors may include: Oscar Wilde, Henry James, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, Robert Musil, Rainer Maria Rilke, Franz Kafka, Wyndham Lewis, Samuel Beckett, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, etc.

HMS-301B  Topics in Modern/Contemporary Literature And Culture: Modernist Drama  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines a sampling of works by modernist playwrights such as Ibsen, Shaw, Brecht, Chekhov, O'Neill and Beckett to explore how contemporary drama has been and continues to be informed by the ideas of these 19th and 20th Century innovators of the theater. A term paper is required.

HMS-301S  SPT: Modern Lit and Cultural Studies Contemporary Literature and Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in modern and contemporary literary and cultural studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-303S  SPT: World Lit and Cultural Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in world literary and cultural studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-304B  American Literature Survey  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines a selection of works, mainly fiction and nonfiction, from the 17th century to the present, which raise interesting questions about American identities and histories, and about narrative and genre.

HMS-304S  Special Topics in American Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in American studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-305A  New Wave Deafness in the Arts  - (3 Credits)  

From an outsider perspective, the non-Deaf community tends to define deafness by the absence of hearing. Broadening our view to include how members of the Deaf community view their experiences, we will familiarize ourselves with disability theory in order to enter a discourse about what role our societal perspectives play in negotiating the line between disability and culture. Based on our understanding of the subjective nature of disability and considering deafness as a culture having departed from disabled origins, we will explore the ways in which Deaf artists, writers, filmmakers, comedians and architects have contributed to mainstream culture and the role their cultural identity plays in their works. We will read academic texts on disability theory, explorative works on deafness, first hand accounts of the Deaf experience as well as observe the cross-genre intertextuality of Deaf expression.

HMS-308A  Topics in European Literatures: Shakespeare  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines representative Shakespearean plays as works of dramatic art and as reflections of Renaissance culture. A term paper is required.

HMS-308B  Topics in European Litertures: Romanticism  - (3 Credits)  

Many of the dominant paradigms of modern Western Culture emerged during the Romantic Period in Britain and Europe (during the late 18th and early 19th century). This course uses the study of Romanticism-- especially though its literatures-- as a way of getting some perspective on these paradigms, which continue to shape the way we think.

HMS-308S  Special Topics in European Literature  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in European literary studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-310S  SPT: Poetry and Poetics New York School Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in poetry and poetics in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-311B  Detective Fiction  - (3 Credits)  

This course will investigate forms of detective fiction- and discourses of mystery and crime more broadly-in literature, cinema and other media. We will rethink their development form the post-Enlightenment urbanization of the gothic in the nineteenth century to the rose of whodunit mysteries and hard-boiled crime fiction in the twentieth century (including connections to other genres like the psychological thriller, western and science fiction), as well as film noir, neo-noir, and more experimental, postmodern and contemporary examples form across nations and cultures. Our critical and theoretical inquiries will consider how stories of criminal transgression and forensic fact-finding relate to historical transformations of subjectivity and society, and how they pose challenging questions about truth, justice and power that persist to this day.

HMS-320A  Topics in Creative Writing: Poetry Writing  - (3 Credits)  

This section of Creative Writing introduces students to poetry writing as process and practice. Students will explore imaginative composition through directed exercises in writing poetry and poetic prose. These exercises will be supported by the close reading and analysis of short works by a variety of authors. Completed exercises will be presented to classmates for constructive comment.

HMS-320B  Topics in Creative Writing: Fiction Writing  - (3 Credits)  

Students will explore the imaginative composition of fiction through regular creative writing assignments and analysis of passages from selected authors.

HMS-320C  Topics in Creative Writing: Screenwriting II  - (3 Credits)  

This course continues Screenwriting I in further developing the use of setting, location, narrative structure, conflict, character development and dialogue. In the first half of the course, students write short scenes. In the second half, they work on scripts for a 10-15 minute film.

HMS-320D  Screenwriting I  - (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the fundamental techniques of screenwriting. Topics covered include formatting, setting, location, narrative structure, conflict, character development and dialogue. In the first half of the course, students write their own short scenes. In the second half, they develop and expand those scenes into a script for a 10-15 minute short film.

HMS-320S  Special Topics: Creative Writing New York School Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in creative writing in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-325C  Reporting the City  - (3 Credits)  

This class will provide a hands-on chance to improve your reporting skills, whether your focus is news or feature writing, We'll explore what it means to be a professional journalist, and you will have a chance to interview diverse people, attend public events and hearings, and write investigative and human interest articles.

HMS-325S  Special Topics: Journalism Tutorial Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in journalism in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-330A  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: Freud and Lacan  - (3 Credits)  

This course covers works by Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, and the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan, who reread Freud through the lens of developing twentieth-century philosophy and structural linguistics. Also examined will be the works of other thinkers, writers, artists and filmmakers that exemplify and/or engage psychoanalytical ideas.

HMS-330B  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: Postmodernism and Creative Practices  - (3 Credits)  

In this class, we will read primarily theoretical writings about Postmodernism and think and write creatively in response to them, considering how they speak to our lives as well as providing resources for our practices as artists, writers, designers. Practices and concepts may include sampling, queering, networks, fractals, emergence and open systems, sustainability, deconstruction, radical plurality, hybridity, irony, kitsch, simulacra, the virtual, and so on. Our focus will be on HOW TO DO THINGS with theory.

HMS-330C  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: Thought, Brain, and Mind  - (3 Credits)  

This course will examine theories of thought, the brain and mind from ancient philosophy to contemporary cognitive neuroscience. Topics may include: self-reflection, recursion, creativity, intuition, rationalism/empiricism, psychoanalysis, neuroanatomy, cognitive science, artificial intelligence, etc. No prior experience in philosophy, computer science or biology is required - just bring yourself and an open mind.

HMS-330S  Special Tpcs in Lit and Cultural Theory Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary and cultural theory in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-331C  Topics in Cultural Studies: Games, Simulation and Performance Politics  - (3 Credits)  

This course will introduce students to ideas in performance studies, and the study of games, gaming, simulations, and virtual reality. Topics may include: ritual, performance, performativity theory, classical game theory, evolutionary game theory, video games and video game studies, screen studies and interfaces, virtual reality, simulation software and cellular automata (ie: Netlogo, 'Game of Life'), etc. No prior knowledge is required, nor any experience with computers.

HMS-331S  Special Topics: Cultural Studies Boundaries Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cultural studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-332S  Special Topics in Gender Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in gender studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-340B  Tpcs Cinema/Media Stds: Myth Into Film Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores analytic approaches to the mythic resonance of selected films, emphasizing classic motifs such as the Hero Quest, Origins, and Death and Rebirth, as well as myths of everyday living. Screenings are preceded by commentary on background information and followed by interpretations of the mythic and cinematographic contributions to the achievement of the films.

HMS-340D  Tpcs Cinema/Media Stds: Cin and New Med New Media  - (3 Credits)  

During cinema's early years there was much debate as to whether film was an entirely new art form, or an art at all. Now, at the dawn of cinema's second century, this course examines the relationship between film, emerging forms of new and digital media, and other aspects of cultural production.

HMS-340E  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: The Documentary Image  - (3 Credits)  

This course introduces students to the history, theory, and practice of making documentary images in photography and video. In addition to reading/viewing visual/critical works and writing short critical and evaluative essays, students will learn to use the basic photo/video tools in Apple's iPhoto and iMovie applications to produce individual and group photo-essay and digital video shorts, and then assemble these with iWeb to display on their own websites. Class time will be split between these academic and 'praxis' components.

HMS-340S  SPT: Cinema and Media Studies Revolutionary Image: Film of the 1960'S Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cinema and media studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-341  Special Topics Revolutionary Image: Film of the 1960'S Film  - (1 Credit)  

This course is designed to enable students in Copenhagen to explore special topics in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-341B  Topics in World Cinema/Media: Gender And Society in Postwar Japanese Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

This screening class will present a historical survey of the major trends in Japanese cinema from the post-war period to the early 1980s. We will study and view classic works by such acknowledged masters of world cinema as Kurosawa, Ozu, and Mizoguchi, but also groundbreaking films by lesser known directors.

HMS-342  Special Topics Revolutionary Image: Film of the 1960'S Film  - (2 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students in Copenhagen to explore special topics in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-342S  SPT: European Cinema and Media Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in European cinema and media in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-343  Special Topics Revolutionary Image: Film of the 1960'S Film  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students in Copenhagen to explore special topics in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-360A  Topics in Performance and Performance Studies: the New Circus  - (3 Credits)  

In this class we will combine practical skills with a study of the historical and theoretical issues involved in the evolving new circus movement. Practical skills include, juggling, slack rope walking, object puppetry, basic partner acrobatics, and clowning. We will explore performance styles ranging from Judson influenced improvisation to clown schtick and the grand circus Ta-Da. We will look at traditional circus history, history of the sideshow, pageantry, political theater, writings on freaks and otherness, contemporary performance art, and clowning. We will also collaborate on an end-of-semester show.

HMS-360C  Introduction to Proformance Practice  - (3 Credits)  

This class explores the art, the play, the technique and the rigorous fun involved in bringing a strong presence to the unique space of performing. The class begins with a focus on physical and vocal training, moving through improvisation, generation material, and working with prepared material. Time and timing, space, tenderness, chaos, intention, perception, lying, and the imaginary are examples of the kinds of ideas we might use as tools to move us into exploratory spaces. This class is required for the Performance and Performance Studies minor but open to non-minors as well.

HMS-360D  Introduction to Performance Studies  - (3 Credits)  

In this course, students will learn the fundamental concepts, terms, and theories in the field of performance studies. Students will learn how to use these frameworks to understand traditional performance arts as well as gain unique perspectives on their own major fields, on other art/design practices, and on everyday life, by learning to see the world performatively. This class is required for the Performance and Performance Studies Minor but open to non-minors as well.

HMS-360S  SPT: Performance Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in performance and performance studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-390A  Poetry Across Media  - (3 Credits)  

What is a poem? Who is a poet? What are the limits of the poem? In this course we will look and listen for poems and the poetic across a variety of contexts. Among our poetic texts will be works publishes as poems in different media (ie: print, audio, internet, & video) and works typically presented as representative of other art forms (such as sculpture, painting, music, video art, conceptual art, net art, and dance). We will discuss these works in the context of poetry criticism and media theory.

HMS-390S  Special Topics in Music and Sound Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in music and sound studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-392A  Languages of Music  - (3 Credits)  

This course is a concentrated introduction to the materials and forms of music. Music is a language. Students will learn to analyze it, write about it and write it. The course aims to demystify music, and particularly music composition, so that students will be empowered as participants in it. Students with no musical training are welcome but should be aware that this is an intensive course that includes the fundamentals of reading music.

HMS-400A  Topics in Literary Studies: The Comic Apocalypse  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines authors responding to the major social, cultural, and spiritual upheavals of the twentieth century with humor, ranging from exuberant release to mocking despair. Representative writers such as Celine, West, Miller, Beckett, Heller, Vonnegut, and Pynchon are examined for their use of mordant irony and sense of the absurd.

HMS-400S  Special Topics in Literary Studies Spt:literary Studies: the Literary Avant Garde  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-403S  Special Topics in World Literature and Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in world literature and culture in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-404A  Topics in American Studies: Democratic Vistas: Issues in Mid-19th-C Am Lit  - (3 Credits)  

This course looks at the first great age of American literature as it coincided with the country's greatest social upheaval, the Civil War. Representative authors will be examined as they express the intellectual contradictions of their times, from the most expansive social and metaphysical optimism to the darkest skepticism.

HMS-404C  Topics in American Studies: Immigration, Diaspora and Citizenship Currents of the American 1950'S and 60'S  - (3 Credits)  

This course will introduce students to the field known as American Studies and its particular approach to representations of immigration, diaspora, and citizenship in American literature and culture.

HMS-404D  Topic in American Studies:Portraying The American Girl in Literature and Visual Art  - (3 Credits)  

This interdisciplinary course will focus on visual and literary representations of American girls that appeared during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We shall also examine feminist work on how this imagery helped shape a range of gender and other social perspectives.

HMS-404E  Topics in American Studies: Photography In American Literature and Culture Visual Art  - (3 Credits)  

This course will investigate the impact photography has had on American literature and culture. Examining a variety of literary, visual, and cultural texts from the middle of the nineteenth century to the present, we will focus on the role photography has played in the construction of race, gender and contestations over American citizenship.

HMS-404S  Special Topics in American Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in American studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-405A  Topics in African American Lit/Culture: Roots of the Harlem Renaissance  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores the historical, cultural and literary roots of the early twentieth-century Harlem Renaissance. Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Dubois, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright and music/film of the era will be examined and discussed.

HMS-405S  Special Topic in African American Literature and Culture  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore particular special topics in African American literature and culture in a seminar setting. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-410A  Modern Poetry Topics in Poetry and Poetics: Modern Po  - (3 Credits)  

This course focuses on key poets of the early 20th Century instrumental in setting the course for modern poetry, and who continue to influence contemporary poetry. Students read essays and poetry by Stéphan Mallarmé, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, William Carlos Williams, Langston Hughes, Mina Loy, HD and André Breton and will consider the question: What makes a poem modern? Features of modern poetry will be explored in the work of such post-WWII poets as Frank O'Hara and Harryette Mullen. Students will hand in short weekly responses and one longer essay.

HMS-410S  Special Topics in Poetry and Poetics  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in poetry and poetics in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-420S  Special Topics in Creative Writing  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in creative writing in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-430A  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: Critical Theory for Artists and Writers  - (3 Credits)  

This course covers foundational texts of critical theory from the nineteenth century (Marx, Freud, Nietzsche), landmarks of the twentieth century (Foucault, Deleuze, Butler, Jameson, Anzaldua, Debray, Kelley), a novel, and selected critical essays.

HMS-430B  Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory: Rhizomatics: a Revolutionary Approach to Thought, Politics, and Creativity  - (3 Credits)  

Rhizomatics is a way of thinking, creating, and living described in the writings of Deleuze, Guattari, Lyotard, DeLanda and Badiou. Through readings of selected works of philosophy by these writers-- on art, politics, ethics, everyday life, desire and sex, biology, music, animal behavior, film, painting, etc-- we will work to understand what it might mean to exist in a state of constant, multi-level becoming. We will also look at works of art, politics, music and media created in response to these often highly experimental writings. No prior experience necessary.

HMS-430D  Psychoanalysis and Art Thought, Politics, and Creativity  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines the relationship between psychoanalysis and art from different perspectives, including the centrality of art and language to the development of psychoanalytic theory and the integration of psychoanalytic theory into the cultural critique of art, literature, and cinema. The course will provide an introduction not only to major psychoanalytic theories, including those of Freud, Jung, and Lacan, but will demonstrate the myriad and complex ways psychoanalysis has become inextricable from contemporary art criticism and theory.

HMS-430S  Special Topics in Literary/Cultural Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in literary and cultural theory in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-431A  Topics in Cultural Studies: Modernism And Postmodernism Thought, Politics, and Creativity  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines literature, art, music, and architecture associated with modernism and postmodernism, along with their philosophical backgrounds. Topics covered include the aesthetic response to the rise of capitalism, differences between modernism and postmodernism, and concepts typically associated with postmodernism, including commodification, globalization, simulacra, pastiche, schizophrenia, paranoia, the decline of historical consciousness, challenges to the universal subject, and time-space compression. Authors covered may include Nietzsche, Proust, Kafka, Mann, Joyce, Woolf, Pynchon, Borges, and Morrison.

HMS-431S  Special Topics in Cultural Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cultural studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-432A  Topics in Gender Studies: Feminist Film and Film Theory Thought, Politics, and Creativity  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores a variety of films alongside some of the classic works of Western feminist film theory, as well as transnational and contemporary feminist writing on film, video, digital media and geo-politics.

HMS-432S  Special Topics in Gender Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in gender studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-433S  Special Topics in Postcolonial Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in postcolonial studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-434A  Topics in Critical Race Studies: Analyzing Race, Seeing Whiteness Thought, Politics and Creativity  - (3 Credits)  

This course will introduce students to various ways of analyzing representations of race. In particular, we will examine the construction of whiteness in U.S. culture by looking at literary, visual, theoretical, and legal texts from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century.

HMS-434B  Representing Difference  - (3 Credits)  

What is a stereotype? What is an archetype? Are all raced types stereotypes? This course explores several approaches to reading types in narratives of different contexts, our study will focus on representations of blackness produces in the US American context. We will read scholarly articles on the nature of stereotype, read essays on narrative conventions and the creative process, and screen creative works that both present and explode stereotypes.

HMS-434S  Special Topics in Critical Race Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in critical race studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-440A  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Film's True Stories: Biography, Historical Fiction and Documentary  - (3 Credits)  

How do our real lives compare to our stories about real lives? This course explores narrative conventions for telling true stories in film. We will investigate differences in approach according to who is presenting the narrative and what the audience is expected to know about the subject. We will identify forms, sounds, and images associated with true stories and trace them across biopics, documentaries, and historical dramas.

HMS-440B  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Cinema And the Modern City Fiction, and Documentary  - (3 Credits)  

This course will study the relationship between the rise of the modern city and the development of photography and cinema. Indeed, it is impossible to imagine the development of the cinema without the city, and cities themselves have been shaped by cinematic form. What is the relation between cityscape and screenspace? How has the modern city been represented in cinema?

HMS-440C  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Contemporary Media Theory Fiction, and Documentary  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores the transformation of society and consciousness by and as media technologies during the long 20th century; students will read some of the most influential works of media analysis written during the past century as well as explore cutting edge analysis generated during the last 20 years.

HMS-440E  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: The Poetics of Cinema Fiction, and Documentary  - (3 Credits)  

This course investigates relationships between image and narrative in cinema. Weekly creative assignments-- informed by close readings of film excerpts and text-- will culminate in the design of a short, poetic film project. We will view visionary work by innovative filmmakers, and engage in close reading, followed by active discussion, to deepen our understanding of artistic choices-- in the use of metaphor, point of view, association, montage, image/action, frame, composition, time, space, kinetics, transformation, multiple perspectives, reflexivity, gesture and the body, non-linear narrative, amongst others-- in the act of visual storytelling central to the cinematic enterprise.

HMS-440F  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Women In International Cinema Fiction, and Documentary  - (3 Credits)  

This course considers the vision of prominent and pioneering films, with particular attention to the gaze, subjectivity, ambivalence, multiplicity of perspective, identification and disruption, as cinematic vocabulary and subject. We will look at films-- in the works of artists such as Agnes Varda, Lois Weber, Claire Denis, Marguerite Duras and Alain Renais, Julie Taymor, Susanna Bier, Rainer Fassbinder, Wong Kar Wai, Ang Lee and Todd Haynes-- with an emphasis on identity, sexuality and gender.

HMS-440I  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies:Film Sound  - (3 Credits)  

Is film a visual medium? This course explores some of the theoretical concerns in designing the sound of a film, including the creation of soundtracks, the use of original scoring, and voiceovers.

HMS-440J  Topics in Cinema/Media Studies: Key Concepts in Net Art  - (3 Credits)  

Net Art is an interdisciplinary field roots in a number of other practices--conceptual art, performance art, video art, video games, poetry, and mail art, to name a few. We will study works of art on the internet and the practices of making and presenting art that precede them. Alongside works of art and art criticism, we will read works about the nature of the internet as a medium. Key concepts include: transmission, narration/narrative, presence, interactivity, identity, instrument, gaming, digital vs. analog, medium and mediation.

HMS-440K  Intensive Film Theory  - (3 Credits)  

This course provides an intensive introduction to film theory and philosophy, contextualized in relation to movements in international film history. Topics likely to include approaches to the cinematic apparatus, montage and mise-en-scene, gaze and spectatorship theory, and approaches drawn from media studies, sound studies, psychoanalysis, semiotics, feminist, queer, and post-colonial studies. The course is required for the Cinema Studies minor but is open to non-minors as well.

HMS-440S  Special Topics in Cinema and Media Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in cinema and media studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-441A  Global Cinema  - (3 Credits)  

In iconic films selected from contemporary global cinema, we will examine how the invention of new cinematic language is used to evoke poignant insight into human experience, and potentially influence our perceptions of reality. Modules organized by genre will consist of screenings, supplemented by guest filmmaker(s), seminar discussions, readings, research and student creative projects.

HMS-460S  Special Topics in Performance & Performance Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in performance and performance studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-461A  Race, Gender, Internet  - (3 Credits)  

As the Internet and social media pervade our daily lives and social relationships, it is crucial that we understand what norms and value are embedded within the technologies we engage with every day. This course understands the Internet as something more than just a means with which to communicate and share information. As students will learn, it is as much a technological form as it is a set of social, cultural, economic, and technological relationships. In this course, we will examine how race, gender, and difference more broadly are embedded in the design, operations, and accessibility of the Internet.

HMS-465A  Culture & Copyright  - (3 Credits)  

Copyright laws intend to protect \"original works of authorship\". But what counts as an original work of authorship and who counts as an authorial subject, as this course will show, are culturally and socially constructed determinations based on dominant norms, assumptions, and values. As a result, the history of copyright is a history of unequal social relations and cultural exchanges. This course investigates this history as well as the ongoing struggles by those excluded or marginalized from copyright law's purview to protect their cultural productions, practices, and knowledge's.

HMS-472A  Bodies, Technology, Visuality  - (3 Credits)  

This course examines how a wide range of technologies form early film lighting technologies to cosmetics to algorithms shape the ways bodies are visualized and represented. The focus on the intertwined relationships of bodies and visual technologies will enable students to understand the social, cultural, and political implications of technological designs and operations.

HMS-483  Visual Journal  - (3 Credits)  

Three credit Humanities course at DIS for Undergraduate students. The visual journal is a process-driven, analytical tool where you record drawn inquiries for this course, as well as for studio, study tours, and self-driven studies. The focus of this course is for you to develop skills on facilitating better explorations and understandings of what you perceive: observing, analyzing, and communicating the diverse human conditions and possibilities of the impact the physical environments and objects has on human behavior. This course will focus on contextual, climatic, historical, social and regulatory dimensions of local cultural aesthetic.

HMS-490A  Topics in Music: Electro-Acoustic Music  - (3 Credits)  

Electro-Acoustic Music acquaints students with the history of electronics in music/audio art, gives them a measure of technical competence with current tools in analog and digital audio and presents exercises that promote original, creative work. Familiarity with Macintosh computers and their operating systems is required for this course. Formal music training is not a prerequisite, but experience playing an instrument and/or a strong desire to create original audio works will be very helpful.

HMS-490S  SPT: Music and Sound Studies  - (3 Credits)  

This course is designed to enable students to explore special topics in music and sound studies in a concentrated way. See HMS website for descriptions of topics being offered in a given semester. Students will learn contemporary theories and methods via an in-depth exploration of the topic at hand. May be repeated for credit as topic changes.

HMS-491A  Topics in Transdisciplinary Studies: Contemporary Artist's Books in  - (3 Credits)  

This course develops critical frameworks for interpreting and creating artists' books; that is, artworks in which the book is a medium. We will study such books alongside histories of the field, theoretical writings, and critical commentaries. These studies will inform our endeavors to create, catalogue, and/or critique artists' books in which visual, verbal, and material elements are interwoven. Advanced students from various fields are encouraged to use and expand their own disciplinary perspectives. Visits to collections around New York City will supplement Pratt's resources.

HMS-492A  Animation Narrative  - (3 Credits)  

Animating Narrative focuses on the fundamentals of storytelling and how to employ strong narrative elements in visual work, with an emphasis on animation and film. As a starting point, the course examines traditional stories and their underlying structures, looking closely at ancient mythologies from various world cultures and the common narrative elements they share, while comparing the visual representations that correspond to these elements. The course advances to less traditional narrative structures (I.e. nonlinear, antiheroic, sensory based, etc.) and the more complex and often abstract, largely nonfigurative or color schematic based visual representations some of these structures have evoked.

HMS-493  Ecopoetics  - (3 Credits)  

Human language use is an inherently ecological practice in that it participates in forming the way we think, write, and act In regards to the world we share with other living things. As such, language can be used as a force for imagining and establishing new ways of living together, but it must also be scrutinized for the ways in which our past and present linguistic concepts and strategies have contributed to a history of unsustainable attitudes and practices. In this course, we will read across a broad spectrum of poetry, philosophy, and history- as well as looking at a number of works in other media (film, video, image, and earthworks)- in order to contextualize contemporary ecolinguistic practices. We will also write: In the spirit of experiment and serious play, our poems and essays will test some of the ideas, concepts and orientations we discover along the way.

HMS-493A  Writing as Photography  - (3 Credits)  

This course explores ways in which writing can recreate and investigate modes of photography. Writing and photography are at a point of potential interchangeability, where both are tools for utilitarian communication and poetic forms. Writing as Photography will enact the historic and contemporary overlap between the two mediums with seminar discussions on readings and workshops on writing exercises in poetry, prose, and criticism.

HMS-494A  Conceptual Art and Writing Practices & Recuperative Strategies  - (3 Credits)  

In this conceptual art-and-writing course, students will design, carry out, and document a \"cultural expedition\" designed to recuperate cultural lineages, dimensions of experience, and kinds of knowledge that are at risk of being lost. We will explore how poetics can expand our notions of sustainability to include cultural recovery and reanimation and we will learn to use specific writing and investigative (action-based) procedures, such as sustained looking practices, not-taking and commonplace books, audio recording and transcription, archive assembly and investigation, and site-specific research and performance. Be ready to step out of the classroom and into a more flexible, open, and versatile way of looking at writing, at the past, and at how we can, out of that past, construct a more diverse and desired world.

HMS-496A  Creative Writing for Art and Design Practice  - (1 Credit)  

This course is a one-credit writing workshop designed to support artistic and design practice and provide students with creative approaches to meet writing required of them in school and more generally. Students will read and write about visual art, design, dance, money, news and politics, science, poetry. They will also write first person essays and collaborative texts about their own practice of making. Students will complete weekly assignments and cooperatively review work in class. Students will be given the opportunity to publish their work on a class blog or print anthology. For a final assignment, students will prepare a writing portfolio and present a revised artists statement.

HMS-496B  Option Transdisciplinary Writing Architecture Students  - (1 Credit)  

This one-credit writing workshop provides an advanced course in transdisciplinary writing as a critical practice in an authorship-collective, dispersed and individual. Continuing the curriculum of HMS 292B in language formation across the disciplines, this course enables students to interpret and stake the critical position as an individual/collective expression. Individual sections may be cross linked and integrated with a section of fourth year Option studio.

HMS-497B  Research Writing for Architecture Students  - (1 Credit)  

This one credit-writing course provides an introduction to language formations across the disciplines. Expanding the curriculum of HMS 291B, this course enables student to develop a material language in negotiation with the social and political dimensions of their mediation processes and representational logics into a public, performance dimension. For a final assignment, students will assemble a text-image based project in a social and political context.

HMS-498B  Advanced Transdisciplinary Writing  - (1 Credit)  

This one credit course provides a capstone in language formations across the disciplines. By adapting principles form the philosophy of language, students will learn to locate a material language that corresponds with their studio design project at once within and beyond the discipline of architecture. In weekly assignments, students will learn through a dedicated writing practice to present their final project as a concept that is derived from a body of research.

HMS-549A  Media Studies Encounters 1  - (1 Credit)  

Media Studies Encounters 1, offered during Fall Semester, gives students a program of events, including speakers, films, presentations, performances, outings, and various other activities designed to introduce a widely varied set of media practices and theories in an informal setting. Discussions will also be held during weeks in which events are not scheduled. Some ongoing writing is required, but because the course is only for one credit, it will only meet for eight sessions at various points throughout the semester.

HMS-549B  Media Studies Encounters 2  - (1 Credit)  

Media Studies Encounters 2, offered during Spring Semester, gives students a program of events, including speakers, films, presentations, performances, outings, and various other activities designed to introduce a widely varied set of media practices and theories in an informal setting. Discussions will also be held during weeks in which events are not scheduled. Some ongoing writing is required, but because the course is only for one credit, it will only meet for eight sessions at various points throughout the semester.

HMS-665A  Culture & Copyright  - (3 Credits)  

Copyright laws intend to protect \"original works of authorship\". But what counts as an original work of authorship and who counts as an authorial subject, as this course will show, are culturally and socially constructed determinations based on dominant norms, assumptions, and values. As a result, the history of copyright is a history of unequal social relations and cultural exchanges. This course investigates this history as well as the ongoing struggles by those excluded or marginalized from copyright law's purview to protect their cultural productions, practices, and knowledge's.